US Open history, all the winners

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Here we give you all the winners and a brief history of the US Open, which started in 1895 with only 11 entries.

The first US Open, staged at the Newport Golf and Country Club on October 4, 1895, was little more than a sideshow to the more prestigious US Amateur.

Both championships were played on the same nine-hole course in the same week after initially being postponed from their September schedule because it conflicted with the Americas Cup yacht races.

The humble Open was played over nine holes four times in the same day with only 10 professionals and one amateur teeing off

The 36-hole event was one won by an unheralded young Englishman Horace Rawlins.

Using a gutta-percha ball, the 21-year-old, the assistant professional at Newport G&CC, shot rounds of 91 and 82 for a winning total of 173.

Rawlins’s share of the $335 prize fund was $150 as compared with the $1,260,000 paid to Graeme McDowell, last year’s winner at Pebble Beach. .

In the first 10 years after Rawlins’ shock win, the US Open was contested mainly by US amateurs and British immigrant professionals who came to the US to earn their living as teachers and club professionals.

Initially the US amateurs took a back seat to the British pros and it wasn’t until 1911 that an American won the US Open for the first time. He was Young John J. McDermott who repeated his triumph in 1912.

It was in 1913, however, the US Open really captured the imagination of the American public when Francis Ouimet, a 20-year-old American amateur, stunned the golf world by defeating the famous English professionals, Harry Vardon and Ted Ray, in a playoff.

The second big surge in the championship’s popularity came together with the spectacular career of the Atlantis amateur Bobby Jones, who won the US Open four times (1923, 1926, 1929, 1930)

He also won the US and British Amateur championships and became the only holder of the Grand Slam as it was then, when he was also victories in the World’s first Major, The Open Championship.

as a result of the publicity he generated, spectator tickets were sold for the first time in 1922 and a boom in entries caused the USGA to introduce sectional qualifying in 1924.

In 1933, after Jones had retired to complete his studies in law, John Goodman became the fifth and final amateur to win the US Open. Other winners were Ouimet, Jerome D Travers (1915), Charles Evans Jr., (1916), and Jones.

In each era, the world’s greatest players have been identified by surviving the rigorous examinations which US Opens invariably provide.

Ben Hogan’s iron will helped bring him four victories (1948, 1950, 1951, 1953).

Arnold Palmer’s record comeback win in 1960, when he fired a final round of 65 to come from seven strokes off the lead, cemented his dashing image with his adoring galleries.

Jack Nicklaus’ historic assault on the professional record book began when he won the first of his four US Open Championships and the first of his record 18 Majors in 1962, his rookie season as a professional.

Nicklaus, who also won in 1967, 1972, and 1980, is one of only four golfers to have won four US Opens. The others are Willie Anderson (1901, 1903, 1904, 1905), Jones and Hogan.

In 1954, the US Open course was roped from tee to green for the first time. That year also marked the first national television coverage. Coverage was expanded by ABC Sports in 1977 so that all 18 holes of the final two rounds were broadcast live.

In 1982, on the ESPN cable network, the first two rounds were broadcast live for the first time. NBC began televising the US Open in 1995.

The original format of the US Open has changed several times.

The USGA extended the championship to 72 holes in 1898, with 36 holes played on each of two days.

In 1926, the format was changed to 18 holes played each on the first two days, then 36 holes on the third day.

It was only in 1965, that the present format of four 18-hole daily rounds was implemented for the first time by the USGA.

In 2002, a two-tee start (from the 1st and 10th) was used for the first and second rounds.

Bethpage State Park’s Black Course in Farmingdale, New York, was the first facility owned by the public to host a US Open. International qualifying sites were added in 2005 when the US Open winner at Pinehurst Resort in North Carolina was New Zealand’s Michael Campbell, who qualified in England.

The most prolific winners in the last two decades have been Tiger Woods (2000, 2002 and 2008), Ernie Els (1994 and 1997) and fellow South African Retief Goosen (2001 and 2004).

The defending champion this week will be Northern Ireland’s Graeme McDowell who won his title at Pebble Beach last year

ALL THE WINNERS

2000 – 2010

2010 – Graeme McDowell
2009 – Lucas Glover
2008 – Tiger Woods
2007 – Angel Cabrera
2006 – Geoff Ogilvy
2005 – Michael Campbell
2004 – Retief Goosen
2003 – Jim Furyk
2002 – Tiger Woods
2001 – Retief Goosen-p
2000 – Tiger Woods

1990 – 1999

1999 – Payne Stewart
1998 – Lee Janzen
1997 – Ernie Els
1996 – Steve Jones
1995 – Corey Pavin
1994 – Ernie Els
1993 – Lee Janzen
1992 – Tom Kite
1991 – Payne Stewart-p
1990 – Hale Irwin-p

1980 – 1989

1989 – Curtis Strange
1988 – Curtis Strange-p
1987 – Scott Simpson
1986 – Ray Floyd
1985 – Andy North
1984 – Fuzzy Zoeller-p
1983 – Larry Nelson
1982 – Tom Watson
1981 – David Graham
1980 – Jack Nicklaus

1970 – 1979

1979 – Hale Irwin
1978 – Andy North
1977 – Hubert Green
1976 – Jerry Pate
1975 – Lou Graham-p
1974 – Hale Irwin
1973 – Johnny Miller
1972 – Jack Nicklaus
1971 – Lee Trevino-p
1970 – Tony Jacklin

1960 – 1969

1969 – Orville Moody
1968 – Lee Trevino
1967 – Jack Nicklaus
1966 – Billy Casper-p
1965 – Gary Player-p
1964 – Ken Venturi
1963 – Julius Boros-p
1962 – Jack Nicklaus-p
1961 – Gene Littler
1960 – Arnold Palmer

1950 – 1959

1959 – Billy Casper
1958 – Tommy Bolt
1957 – Dick Mayer-p
1956- Cary Middlecoff
1955 – Jack Fleck-p
1954 – Ed Furgol
1953 – Ben Hogan
1952 – Julius Boros
1951 – Ben Hogan
1950 – Ben Hogan-p

1940 – 1949

1949 – Cary Middlecoff
1948 – Ben Hogan
1947 – Lew Worsham-p
1946 – Lloyd Mangrum-p
1942-45 – Not played due to World War II
1941 – Craig Wood
1940 – Lawson Little-p

1930 – 1939

1939 – Byron Nelson-p
1938 – Ralph Guldahl
1937 – Ralph Guldahl
1936 – Tony Manero
1935 – Sam Parks Jr.
1934 – Olin Dutra
1933 – Johnny Goodman
1932 – Gene Sarazen
1931 – Billy Burke-p
1930 – Bobby Jones

1920 – 1929

1929 – Bobby Jones-p
1928 – Johnny Farrell-p
1927 – Tommy Armour p
1926 – Bobby Jones
1925 – Willie MacFarlane-p
1924 – Cyril Walker
1923 – Bobby Jones-p
1922 – Gene Sarazen
1921 – Jim Barnes
1920 – Ted Ray

1910 – 1919

1919 – Walter Hagen-p
1917-18 – Not played due to World War I

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