Tears as Matthew wins Open

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Catriona Matthew on Sunday became the first Scot to win a women’s major – just 11 weeks after having a second child.

Catriona Matthew became the first Scot to win a women’s major – a mere 11 weeks after becoming a mother for the second time.
Playing only her second tournament since returning to the game, Matthew took the Ricoh British Open at Royal Lytham by three strokes from Australia’s former World No 1 Karrie Webb.
“I had a tear in my eye coming up the last,” said the 39-year-old, who has been a professional for 14 years. “I was overcome by it all.”
Three clear with a round to go, things looked to be slipping away from her when she bogeyed the first, third and 10th and fell into a tie with Japan’s Ai Miyazato, winner of last week’s Evian Masters in France.
But then Matthew sank putts of 15 and 35 feet at the 13th and 14th and two-putted the long 15th for a third successive birdie to go clear.
Although she bogeyed the 17th, the big mistakes were being made elsewhere.
American star Paula Creamer, having climbed into second place, double-bogeyed the last and Miyazato double-bogeyed the 17th.
Matthew, who with her husband Graeme had to escape from an apartment block fire in France last week, took the first prize of just over £197,000 with a closing 73 and three-under aggregate of 285.
“I really can’t quite believe it,” said world number 64 Matthew after hugging her husband, who also acts as her caddie and who had already taken the flag off the flagstick at the last.
“I think having children has kind of calmed me down. I don’t get as bad-tempered – and Graeme might agree, or he might not,” she said with a smile.
“My aim was always to win a major and the British for me is obviously the biggest. You do think chances might be running out and I am obviously delighted.”
Webb, a three-time winner of the title and seven-time major champion, produced a best-of-the-day 68, including an eagle on the 15th and birdie on the 16th.
But it was not entirely a happy week for the 34-year-old world number nine, though.
She received a call just before teeing off in the first round on Thursday telling her that her hotel room was one of a number burgled while she was having breakfast.
Jewellery was among “a lot of stuff” taken and Webb said her reaction after the call was: “How am I supposed to play now?”
She shot a five-over-par 77, but played the final three rounds in five under to earn £123,539.
Creamer and Miyazato ended up sharing third place on one over with American Christina Kim and Korean Hee-won Han.
It was also the day on which Solheim Cup places for both the Americans and Europe were decided – but nothing changed.
England’s Laura Davies, an ever-present in the match since it was launched in 1990, will play for the 11th time in Illinois later this month.
Natalie Gulbis was the US player in danger of being knocked out, but Jane Park had to finish second and instead dropped to 17th.
Gulbis joins Creamer, Kim, Cristie Kerr, Angel Stanford, Nicole Castrale, Brittany Lang, Morgan Pressel, Kristy McPherson and Brittany Lincicome as the automatic qualifiers.
That left captains Alison Nicolas and Beth Daniel to name three and two wild cards respectively and it looked a certainty that 19-year-old Michelle Wie would be one of Daniel’s choices after a 69 lifted the 19-year-old to 11th place in the championship.
ALL THE FINAL ROUND SCORES
(USA unless stated, par 72):

285 Catriona Matthew (Sco) 74 67 71 73
288 Karrie Webb (Aus) 77 71 72 68
289 Paula Creamer 74 74 70 71, Ai Miyazato (Jpn) 75 71 70 73, Hee-Won Han (Kor) 77 73 69 70, Christina Kim 73 71 71 74
290 Kristy McPherson 74 74 72 70
291 Ji-Yai Shin (Kor) 77 71 68 75, Na Yeon Choi (Kor) 80 71 70 70, Cristie Kerr 76 71 75 69
292 Mika Miyazato (Jpn) 76 72 69 75, Giulia Sergas (Ita) 74 67 78 73, Michelle Wie 73 76 74 69, Song-Hee Kim (Kor) 70 73 74 75, Maria Hjorth (Swe) 72 76 73 71, Hee Young Park (Kor) 71 75 73 73
293 Jane Park 74 72 72 75, Michele Redman 75 75 73 70, Kyeong Bae (Kor) 73 71 74 75
294 Ya-Ni Tseng (Tai) 74 70 78 72, Se Ri Pak (Kor) 76 71 73 74, In Kyung Kim (Kor) 81 70 70 73, Angela Stanford 70 76 74 74
295 In-Bee Park (Kor) 76 72 76 71
296 Shinobu Moromizato (Jpn) 74 73 71 78, Jeong Jang (Kor) 79 73 72 72
297 Jade Schaeffer (Fra) 79 71 75 72
298 Vicky Hurst 74 75 77 72, Teresa Lu (Tai) 75 76 77 70, Lorena Ochoa (Mex) 75 77 72 74, Brittany Lincicome 77 73 79 69, Katie Futcher 75 77 70 76
299 Yuri Fudoh (Jpn) 80 73 70 76, Sun Young Yoo (Kor) 79 73 75 72, Becky Morgan (Wal) 80 71 72 76, Yuko Mitsuka (Jpn) 71 71 79 78, Sophie Gustafson (Swe) 74 71 82 72, Brittany Lang 81 70 71 77, Sandra Gal (Ger) 69 80 75 75
300 Allison Hanna-Williams 76 76 73 75, Katherine Hull (Aus) 75 77 77 71
301 Marianne Skarpnord (Nor) 76 69 76 80, Meena Lee (Kor) 74 74 76 77, Morgan Pressel 77 72 76 76, Martina Eberl (Ger) 75 75 72 79
302 Il Mi Chung (Kor) 76 76 75 75, Laura Davies (Eng) 79 74 75 74, Ursula Wikstrom (Fin) 74 79 75 74, Mi Jung Hur (Kor) 76 73 74 79, Carmen Alonso (Spa) 75 77 77 73
303 Anna Nordqvist (Swe) 78 75 75 75, Irene Cho 77 73 77 76, Samantha Head (Eng) 74 76 72 81, Sarah Lee 75 77 70 81
304 Jin young Pak (Kor) 80 73 74 77, Momoko Ueda (Jpn) 74 76 77 77
305 Eunjung Yi (Kor) 78 75 73 79, Christel Boeljon (Ned) 79 73 74 79
306 Young Kim (Kor) 78 71 77 80, Anna-Lise Caudal (Fra) 75 78 75 78, Emma Zackrisson (Swe) 75 77 76 78, Louise Stahle (Swe) 77 76 76 77
307 Lee-Anne Pace 75 77 75 80, Reilley Rankin 77 76 78 76
308 Kris Tamulis 78 75 82 73
309 Vikki Laing 73 80 77 79
310 Stacy Prammanasudh 75 75 79 81, Laura Diaz 76 76 76 82, Shanshan Feng (Chn) 80 72 77 81
312 Karin Sjodin (Swe) 75 74 79 84
DSQ: Eun Hee Ji (Kor) 76 74 81 75

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