Carnoustie

Courses

Also in the frame this week is Carnoustie, the second of the three Scottish clubs that will host the Alfred Dunhill Links championship.
Carnoustie, where, along with St Andrews and Kingsbarns, the Dunhill tees off on Thursday , is said to be one of the 10 oldest golf clubs in the world and is considered to be the toughest of the three in play this week.
Situated in the town of Carnoustie in Angus in the east of Scotland and ranked as one of the most difficult of all the Open Championship courses, it has records to show that golf was first played there as far back as 1527 – even before the game reached St Andrews.
St Andrew, generally regarded as the cradle of modern golf, did not see golf being played in the town until 1552.
In 1890, the 14th Earl of Dalhousie, who owned land at Carnouistie, sold the links course to the people of the town with the condition that it be kept available for their recreation in perpetuity.
The towns people remain the owners to this day, but the towns Golf club and its three courses is managed on their behalf by Angus Town Council.
The original course consisted of only ten holes which crossed and re crossed the Barry Burn, but when a coastal railway from Dundee to Arbroath was opened in 1838 it brought in a large influx of enthusiastic golfers from as far afield as Edinburgh, all of them wishing to soak up a little history by tackling the ancient and storied Carnoustie links.
This led to a complete restructuring of the course in 1867 by one of the best known of the early Open champions, Old Tom Morris.
Under his guidance the course was extended to eighteen holes which had, meanwhile, become standard throughout Scotland.
The two additional courses that have since been added at Carnoustie are Burnside and the shorter though equally testing Buddon Links.
Carnoustie hosted it’s first Open Championship in 1931, after modifications to the course by James Braid in 1926.
The first winner then was legendary Scotsman Tommy Armour of Edinburgh.
Later Open winners at Carnoustie were England’s Henry Cotton in 1937, American Ben Hogan in 1953, South African Gary Player in 1968, a second American, Tom Watson in 1975, and a second Scotsman, Paul Lawrie in 1999, Lawrie, and Watson before him, having to go to play-offs before they could claim ‘Ye Auld Claret Jug’.
‘The Beast’, nicknamed “Car-nasty” by the Americans in 1999, is today considered by many to be the most difficult course on the Open rota and one of the toughest courses in the world.
Apart from the pain it inflicted on the field in general, the 1999 Open Championship is best remembered for the epic collapse of French golfer Jean Van de Velde, who needed only a double-bogey six on the 72nd hole to win it.
Inexplicably he shot a triple-bogey seven after attempting to play a shot out of the water, and after tying Lawrie and 1997 champion Justin Leonard with a 6-over 290, he saw Lawrie go on to win the playoff.
Carnoustie has, since 1999, found a place in psychology speak.
The term, “Carnoustie effect”, is defined as “that degree of mental and psychical shock experienced on collision with reality by those whose expectations are founded on false assumptions.”
Coming on the heels of the hardships at Oakmont Golf Club at the recent US Open, Carnoustie could quite easily have grown men crying again as did Sergio Garcia, then 19, in 1999 when he was reported to have run straight off the course and into his mothers arms in tears.
GREEN FEES:

Charges from 1st April 2013 – 31st October 2013

Combination Tickets:
Championship, Burnside and Buddon Links* £172.00
Championship and Burnside* £167.00
Championship and Buddon Links* £162.00
Note: Junior (14 – 18 years incl.) Combination prices are 50% of those quoted above.
* To be used over a 3 day period

Single rounds
Championship Course
Single Round (final 2 weeks in October £480 a fourball) £147.00
Junior (14 – 18 inclusive) £73.50
Note: Juveniles are under 14 years and not permitted to play on the Championship course.
Note: The handicap limit for Men is 28 and for Ladies 36.

Burnside Course
Single Round £40.00
Junior Round £20.00
Juvenile Round £10.00

Buddon Links Course
Single Round £35.00
Junior Round £17.50
Juvenile Round £5.00

Golf Trolley Hire – Per Day £5

Charges from 1st November 2013 – 31st March 2014:

Combination Tickets
Championship, Burnside and Buddon Links* £86.00
Championship and Burnside* £83.50
Championship and Buddon Links* £81.00
Note: Junior (14 – 18 years incl.) Combination prices are 50% of those quoted above.
* To be used over a 3 day period

Single Tickets

Championship Course
Single Round £73.50
Junior (14 – 18 inclusive) £36.75
Note: Juveniles are under 14 years and not permitted to play on the Championship course.
Note: The handicap limit for Men is 28 and for Ladies 36.

Burnside Course
Single Round £20.00
Junior Round £10.00
Juvenile Round £5.00

Buddon Links Course
Single Round £17.50
Junior Round £8.74
Juvenile Round £2.50

Golf Trolley Hire – Per Day £5
Caddies – Fee per bag per round £45

Charges from 1st April 2014 to 31st October 2014:

Combination Tickets
Championship, Burnside and Buddon Links* £180.00
Championship and Burnside* £175.00
Championship and Buddon Links* £170.00
Note: Junior (14 – 18 years incl.) Combination prices are 50% of those quoted above.
* To be used over a 3 day period

Single Tickets

Championship Course
Single Round (April to October) £154.00
Single Round April – 4 Ball Special £480.00
Junior (14 – 18 inclusive) £77.00
Note: Juveniles are under 14 years and not permitted to play on the Championship course.
Note: The handicap limit for Men is 28 and for Ladies 36.

Burnside Course
Single Round £42.00
Junior Round £21.00
Juvenile Round £10.50

Buddon Links Course
Single Round £37.00
Junior Round £18.50
Juvenile Round £5.00

Golf Trolley Hire – Per Day £5
Caddies – Fee per bag per round £50HOW THE COURSE SHOULD PLAY
1st (Cup), 406yds, par 4: The Barry Burn down the left is out of bounds. A bunker lies in wait for any drive leaked a little right and the higher left side of the fairway gives a view of the sunken green over a ridge with bunkers short right.
1999: rank 14; average 4.28; birdies 37, pars 277, bogeys 122, double bogeys 17, worse 3.
2nd (Gully), 463yds, par 4: Braid’s bunker is in the middle of the fairway, but at 215 yards out it is not the same danger as the traps left and right further down. The narrow green, guarded by more bunkers, is 57 yards long and has out of bounds beyond.
1999: rank 13; average 4.31; birdies 37, pars 270, bogeys 121, doubles 26, worse 2.
3rd (Jockie’s Burn), 358yds, par 4: Totally re-designed since 1999. Rough eats into the fairway from the right at 250 yards and two deep bunkers in it makes players think about whether to go left or over it closer to Jockie’s Burn short of the green. The lay-up option is not so simple because of new rough mounding.
1999: rank 16; average 4.06; eagles 1, birdies 61, pars 313, bogeys 73, doubles 7, worse 1.
4th (Hillocks), 412yds, par 4: Into the prevailing south-west wind. Tight drive between bunker right and then left, but anything slightly left can find a ditch. Bunkers narrow the entrance to the only double green on the course, shared with the 14th.
1999: rank 10; average 4.35; birdies 33, pars 259, bogeys 140, doubles 21, worse 2.
5th (Brae), 415yds, par 4: Jockie’s Burn cross the fairway at 300 yards and just before it are two bunkers. Hole dog-legs right and the two-tier green is 57 yards deep with bunkers short and left.
1999: rank 12; average 4.31; birdies 35, pars 270, bogeys 127, doubles 22, worse 2.
6th (Hogan’s Alley), 578yds, par 5: Named after Ben Hogan for his preferred route close to the out of bounds fence left of the bunkers in the middle of the fairway. A new trap has been added at 310 yards. Ditch runs down the right 80 yards short of the angled, undulating green. No eagles in 1999 and not that many birdies.
1999: rank 4; average 5.49; birdies 34, pars 219, bogeys 157, doubles 37, worse 9.
7th (Plantation), 410yds, par 4: The out of bounds fence is still on the left, but this time there’s rough separating it from the fairway. Bunkers on the right may see many keep driver in the bag depending on the wind. Shallow green protected by deep bunker front right.
1999: rank 5; average 4.47; eagles 1, birdies 30, pars 228, bogeys 152, doubles 43, worse 2.
8th (Short), 183yds, par 3: Long wait for the first par three, but it is a real tester. Heather and gorse in front of the tee, out of bounds left again, a hollow short of the green and two bunkers either side.
1999: rank 15; average 3.27; birdies 44, pars 264, bogeys 132, doubles 14, worse 2.
9th (Railway), 478yds, par 4: Played the toughest hole eight years ago, partly because of evil rough around the green. Averaged fewer than six birdies each day. Four bunkers – three right, one left – are at driving distance and trees line the left-hand side and frame the long, narrow green.
1999: rank 1; average 4.57; birdies 23, pars 207, bogeys 178; doubles 39, worse 9.
10th (South America), 466yds, par 4: A cluster of bunkers down the right and one at almost 300 yards on the left tighten the driving area. There are also trees flanking the left, but the large one short right of the green, just over the Barry Burn, impacts more, as do two more bunkers on the left.
1999: rank 8; average 4.39; eagles 1, birdies 37, pars 241; bogeys 143, doubles 29, worse 5.
11th (Dyke), 383yds, par 4: No need for driver normally. Accuracy the key between bunkers before the hole curves right. The green is deceptively long and well-protected, but off a good drive players are thinking birdie.
1999: rank 11; average 4.33; birdies 31, pars 270, bogeys 132, doubles 19, worse 4.
12th (Southward Ho), 499yds, par 4: Plays as a par five off the back tee for members, but becomes a really tough par four for the Open. Craig Parry had a triple bogey here when leading on the last day in 1999. Left is best off the tee and the green lies over bunkered mounds.
1999: rank 2; average 4.57; birdies 13, pars 227, bogeys 167, doubles 44, worse 5.
13th (Whins), 176yds, par 3: A large horseshoe bunker is positioned before a green 43 yards long, but it is the two bunkers pinching into the middle area of the green and the slope from back to front which really adds difficulty.
1999: rank 17; average 3.02; birdies 66, pars 317, bogeys 69, doubles 4.
14th (Spectacles), 514yds, par 5: Almost blind tee shot over gorse and rough to a fairway which turns left by the largest of four bunkers. The feature of the hole, though, are the two deep Spectacles bunkers 50 yards short of the green. They block the view not just of the putting surface, but also two more traps.
1999: rank 18; average 4.84; eagles 11, birdies 234, pars 173, bogeys 33, doubles 4, worse 1.
15th (Lucky Slap), 472yds, par 4: Start of the toughest finish in golf. Fairway tilts from left to right towards bunkers and the approach had to be really well-struck to avoid more sand short on both sides. Wildly left and trees comes into play.
1999: rank 6; average 4.46; birdies 23, pars 233, bogeys 172, bogeys 26, worse 2.
16th (Barry Burn), 248yds, par 3: In two Opens here, including one he won in a play-off, Tom Watson failed to make a par once. The length makes it hard enough, but the green is raised and bunkers short narrow the way in. Only the 12th saw fewer birdies in 1999.
1999: rank 9; average 3.39; birdies 21, pars 252, bogeys 169, bogeys 14.
17th (Island), 461yds, par 4: The Barry Burn is in front of the tee and then twists back, coming in from the left and cutting the fairway in half. The area to the right short of the water has had gentle mounding and rough added, putting more of a premium on accuracy. Long second has to carry bunkers.
1999: rank 2; average 4.57; birdies 24, pars 217, bogeys 162, doubles 39, worse 14.
18th (Home), 499yds, par 4: forever to be remembered for Jean Van de Velde’s seven. He got away with pushing his drive close to the Barry Burn, but two shots later after hitting the grandstand and rebounding into dense rough he was in the water. Paul Lawrie bounced over it on the 72nd hole, but made a brilliant birdie to win the play-off.
1999: rank 7; average 4.45; birdies 35, pars 235, bogeys 140, doubles 39, worse 7.
Key to rank: 1 = hardest, 18 = easiest.

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